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Children and Permaculture

Children and Permaculture

Children are the Key to the Future

Children are the future – that is for certain. It is their future that we pave the way for right now, so we are merely guardians or caretakers of this earth. But in what state will they inherit the earth? And how might permaculture help us and our children?

For those who don’t know what Permaculture is, here’s a (very)  quick explanation. It’s a philosophy or design system that works with, rather than against nature through holistic observation of plants and animals. “The problem is the solution” is the famous quote by Bill Mollison, who co-developed permaculture as an integrated system of design.

 

Children and Permaculture in Action

 

One person following this design system and working with kids is Yongo Otieno Wycliffe, a young Kenyan, whose central goal is to educate and empower people to work together in creating communities that are energy-efficient, sanitary, and abundant in food and housing. Currently, he is working on the S.H.A.R.E  Peace Permaculture project  (Sustainable Housing Agriculture Reaching Everyone). Those who will benefit from this are rural African communities, and especially children, youth and women living in rural Kenya.

I managed to briefly catch up with him and ask him a couple of questions about his work with children in permaculture. These are his responses. I think you’ll find them heart-warming and also inspirational!

 

Q: Our members are impressed by your efforts to educate and empower communities to work together and how your current project has children at its core. What inspired you to get into teaching sustainable living practices?

 

I love working hard and helping out. I work in as many farms as i can, especially in the sounding villages. What inspired me was I am very interested in developing sustainable energy, agricultural, and building systems, and interested in developing local energy policies that promote permanence in a system that is regenerative, efficient and progressive. I have spent many of my days volunteering for various gardening and farming activities and I love learning about local techniques in building the soil, building practices and working with children, youths, and women.  Educating and empowering them to work together is my central goal and my desire to help them escape extreme poverty.

 

Q:What advice would you give to anyone wanting to start or get involved in a community project?

The advice I can give is see the needs with your eyes and meet them with your heart.

 

Q: Can you tell us some activities that children really enjoy on the SHARE project?

Kids are passionately curious about everything we do – gardening, dancing, singing, and  playing football since they have different talents and we empower them besides gardening.

 

Q: Do you have any advice for parents, guardians, or teachers on how to engage children on nature subjects?

Children learn from different times and when they are ready to so don’t push them to learn when they aren’t ready. Understand the best time when he/she is interested to and what she wants to learn about.

Q: How can people reading this get involved in your project or in a project like yours?

To be involved with us you can either visit us any day, anytime, no appointments. You are required to come work with us or donate to support our activities. It will be much appreciated – also join the Facebook children’s group – Permaculture for Children – and tell you friends and families about our activities .

Q: How can we help make the SHARE project a reality?

If you wish you can donate to the current crowdfunding campaign on this link below.

https://www.gofundme.com/sharepermaculture

 

If you’d like to support this project, please do get in touch with Yongo and his colleagues. Also, if this inspires you to start a kid’s permaculture project in your area, let us know!

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